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A sad story about an animal auction.

4 Apr

“Livestock” animal charity auction in Houston [TW?]

TW if you’re the kind of person who is really, truly upset by even hearing about animal slaughter.

I thought this was an especially sad and weird article:

After school and basketball practice, Mr. Leach would look after Kipper, massaging his legs and brushing a lotion on the bottom of his cloven hooves to help his sore feet. Out of the 2,526 barrows at the Houston event, the judges declared Kipper the 2012 grand champion, making him the star of the swine auction. Mr. Leach is still trying to get his head around it: His pig will put him through college.

Awww, that’s really sweet!  Appreciating animals usually thought of as chattel as creatures just like dogs and cats (and rats, can’t forget about my sweet rat babies.)  It sounds like the kid formed a real bond with the pig.

Inevitably, the auctions turn out better for the animals’ owners than for the animals themselves. Three days after the auction, Kipper was put in a trailer and driven to a meat science laboratory at Texas A & M University, where he was slaughtered and placed in a cooler. Once his drug test results come in, Kipper will be butchered, boxed and, along with 66 other top-ranking barrows, donated to charity. The four couples who bought Kipper will each receive a 54-pound gourmet pork package.

Oh.  Never mind about that, then.  Did nobody at the auction find this a little creepy?

Also: “meat science”?  Texas A&M, what are you doing?

Interlude from the Wynn: Thoughts on Weekday Vegetarianism

25 Mar

I’m on vacation at the Wynn, which is vegan paradise for two reasons: 1) Every restaurant–and there are plenty–offers a vegan option! and 2) The vegan menu is way cheaper than the regular menu.

For example (pictures to come) I got a vegan burger, fries, and a little shake (yes!  Too minty, but a good consistency and taste otherwise, especially if you’re into mint, which I’m not) for $9, or more than double that if you go carnivorous and feel like fries, too.  Nice!   So we also got the cashew cream spinach and artichoke dip, which was both huge and delicious.  This morning?  Vegan blueberry muffin.  Yesterday evening?  Vegan chocolate chip cookie.

While I agree that it’s a joy to go to a vegan restaurant and eat anything on the menu, even more exciting to me is just knowing you can ask, “Is there a vegan menu available?” knowing that the answer is always yes, and then being able to eat ANYWHERE, basing your decision on what kind of food you feel like instead of what places offer something you could maybe eat if you were a rabbit half your current size.

Anyway.  Awesome!  (My omnivorous boyfriend is even eating a bunch of vegan food here, partially because it’s good, and also because it’s cheap.  Motives aside, the adorable little cows thank you very much.)  Actually, it’s because my boyfriend is taking some time to do schoolwork (poor thing) that I am taking a break to write once again, this time about the merits and demerits of weekday vegetarianism.  I must caution that this is a long article, but it’s an interesting topic since the whole “Meatless Monday” and “flexitarian” thing is gaining ground.

As I write more, I realize this is approaching dissertation-length, so I’ll sum up my points before the cut.

  1. Weekday vegetarianism is not inherently more eco-friendly than eating meat–that is, the mere elimination of meat and its replacement with any old thing does not necessarily consume fewer resources.  A romp with some statistics shows us how.
  2. The use of “vegetarian” to mean things other than its commonly accepted definition detracts from our ability to understand each other when we describe things or people as vegetarian.  It has nothing to do with exclusion or smugness or only wanting Certain People to be given the title of vegetarian; it just has to do with having a comprehensible debate with agreed-upon terms.
  3. If the ethical precepts of vegetarianism are given any credence by weekday vegetarians, as they seem to be in the TED talk referenced later in this post, then weekday vegetarianism becomes “I only kill things for fun on the weekends, but it just doesn’t bother me as much when I limit it to those particular days!”

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The happiest pig ever!

26 Feb

Reading over Farm Sanctuary’s stories of rescued livestock animals.  There was a video of a visitor and farm worker bottle-feeding three baby calves, but I can’t seem to find it, so please enjoy this bouncy piglet.

If you have some time and are in search of adorable things, reading through Farm Sanctuary’s “Featured Adoption” page is totally worth it.  Also, they just rescued a ton of farm animals who need veterinary care!  So, if you’re looking for a good place to send some advocacy money, there it is.  Plus, cute animals.  Hooray!

This is a picture of a pork chop.

27 Jan

Not safe for ever.

Not that rotten plants can’t be gross, but oozing, pus-filled abscesses wig me out a little more.

Or, you know, you could get your protein from tofu and quinoa, but that’s super lame, amirite guys?

veg 4eva

“It’s not exactly toxic waste. It’s pig blood. Odds are that a lot of little marine critters are enjoying their bonanza.”

23 Jan

Eeeyew.  Check out the full story here.

While I doubted highly before I read the comments (why do I do this, it’s like punching myself in the face!) that this is going to stop anyone from eating bacon, I’m surprised at the amount of defense the company is getting.

Notably, a Google search for “do fish eat pig blood” turned up exactly jack shit.  Also, the state of Texas and related health agencies categorize all blood as a biohazard (as another very easy Google search determined).

There was going to be an artist’s depiction of fish eating blood, but it turns out my drawing skills don’t translate to drawing on a tablet in Photoshop.

So: Fish don’t eat pig blood.  Pig blood is gross. The end.